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US Architecture Billings Index remains in the black

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US Architecture Billings Index remains in the black

| aia, architecture, architecture jobs, recession | April 27, 2011

Signs of recovery – but some practices just hanging on

Work for architects in the US stayed close to break-even level during the first quarter of this year.

The American Institute of Architects reported that the score for its Architecture Billings Index was 50.5 for March – down slightly on the 50.6 recorded the previous month. Any mark above 50 reflects an increase in billings. The new projects inquiry index was 58.7, up from February’s figure of 56.4.

AIA chief economist Kermit Baker said: “Currently, architecture firms are essentially caught swimming upstream in a situation where demand is not falling back into negative territory but also not exhibiting the same pace of increases seen at the end of 2010.

“The range of conditions reported continues to span a very wide spectrum with some firms reporting an improving business environment and even ramping up staffing, while others continue to operate in survival mode. The catalyst for a more robust recovery is likely financing.”

Article via Building Design Mag

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After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

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