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The 4 Best Architecture Related Careers for New Graduates

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The 4 Best Architecture Related Careers for New Graduates

| Architecture Careers | June 13, 2018

Congratulations on your recent graduation.

It probably feels pretty amazing to have that degree.

Of course, the longer you go without using it, the more that degree is going to become an irritating reminder. So, let’s look at four of the best architecture careers you can start pursuing right away.

The 4 Best Architecture Related Careers to Get Started in Right Now

The field of architecture is at least as broad as it is old. As such, it’s probably fair to say that there are countless architecture careers out there for you to consider.

However, the following four fields will give you plenty of diverse options beyond the traditional versions. Best of all, each features plenty of job openings throughout the country.

  1. Landscape Architect

Landscape architects are responsible for planning and creating landscapes, which can include manmade features, as well. Oftentimes, landscape architects need to collaborate with others, so that their creations complement buildings that will share the same environment (and vice versa).

This career may also involve the long-term care of the landscape, as well. This is when a talent for the natural sciences is very helpful.

  1. Urban Planner

While urban planners and architects are not the same thing, the former relies on the latter. In fact, many architects make a career out of leveraging their skills specifically to help with urban planning.

As a huge part of this field involves the buildings in urban environments, it requires an architect who’s able to take the resources available (including money and space) and make the most of them. An architect who becomes proficient at this will never be long without work.

  1. Architecture Journalist

Architecture is such a massive industry that it requires an equally impressive army of journalists. Unfortunately, most journalists don’t have a very good understanding of architecture. They might be able to cover the topic for those outside the industry, but their lack of knowledge wouldn’t go unnoticed by those who depend on a high-level expertise for a living.

If you understand everything from the vocabulary unique to architects to its history and current trends, you’ll be a priceless asset as a journalist for this industry.

  1. Architectural Historian  

Finally, if you have a passion for history and architecture, you will be uniquely qualified to become an architectural historian.

In short, as an architectural historian, your job will involve advising restoration projects aimed at buildings of historical significance. This often involves researching the building to better understand the materials and methods that were used to build it.

Want an Expert’s Help Considering Architecture Careers?

While we hope that the above list of possible architecture careers is helpful, we know that this decision is a big one and you may want some help with it.

At Consulting For Architects, Inc. Careers we’ve helped recent graduates just like you with this important next step, ensuring that they find jobs which fall in line with their interests and career goals. Contact us today at (212) 532-4360 or [email protected] to learn more about how we can help you do the exact same thing.

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About the author

After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

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