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How to find a job using Linkedin

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How to find a job using Linkedin

| unemployed architects | June 24, 2009

By Laura Brown
June 22, 2009
If you’re not familiar with Linkedin, go to the Linkedin Learning Center to get your basic questions answered. Then register (there’s no cost to start a basic account) and design a complete business profile that highlights your accomplishments. Think of this as your online resume. What would you want a prospective employer to read about you?
Also, remember that anyone at your company can see this profile, so if you don’t want your current employer to know that you are looking for a job, don’t mention it.
After you finish your profile, you can start to invite your current colleagues and friends to connect with you.  You can also reconnect with people you worked with in the past. Search for colleagues at past jobs by using the “Search” button at the top of the page or go to the bottom of the page and look under “Just Joined Linkedin”.  It will show people at the companies that you worked for that you might know.
Next, you want to expand your profile by asking colleagues to write references for you on Linkedin. Make sure to write references for them also.
Full article via Examiner.com
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About the author

After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

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