logo

Eisenhower Memorial architect says he’s open to design changes in response to family criticism

Home » architecture » Eisenhower Memorial architect says he’s open to design changes in response to family criticism

Eisenhower Memorial architect says he’s open to design changes in response to family criticism

| architecture, architecture critic | March 20, 2012

This image provided by Gehry Partners shows the Eisenhower Memorial Pedestrian Experience. Planners of a memorial honoring Dwight D. Eisenhower respond to criticism that the Frank Gehry design puts too much emphasis on Eisenhower’s rural Kansas roots and not enough on his achievements as a military hero and president. (Associated Press)

WASHINGTON – Famed architect Frank Gehry says he is open to design changes in a planned Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial in Washington to try to answer objections from Ike’s family.

A letter from Gehry was introduced as testimony in a House subcommittee hearing Tuesday.

Susan Eisenhower, the 34th president’s granddaughter, told the panel her family wants the memorial to be redesigned.

A hearing in Congress could pressure memorial planners to make changes. But the panel does not have a direct role in approving the design.

Final approval of Gehry’s concept from a commission that approves architecture in the nation’s capital has been delayed amid ongoing objections from the family. The family wants the project to focus more on Ike’s accomplishments and less on his rural Kansas roots.

‘Like’ CFA’s Facebook page for job openings for architects and interior designers

Check out CFA Founder/CEO David McFadden’s about.me profile!

 

Share with your colleagues
RSS
Follow by Email
Twitter
Visit Us
Follow Me
YouTube
YouTube
LinkedIn
Share
Houzz
Houzz
About the author

After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

No comments so far!

Share with your colleagues!

RSS
Follow by Email
Twitter
Visit Us
Follow Me
YouTube
YouTube
LinkedIn
Share
Houzz
Houzz
New Jobs