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David Dillon, longtime Dallas Morning News architecture critic, dies at 68

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David Dillon, longtime Dallas Morning News architecture critic, dies at 68

| architecture, architecture critic | June 04, 2010

Hat tip to Dallas Morning News.

I have enjoyed reading Dillon’s critic’s over the years.  I am sorry to learn of his passing.

 

David Dillon, for 25 years architecture critic of The Dallas Morning News and one of the country’s foremost writers on the subject, died early Thursday of a heart attack at his home in Amherst, Mass. He was 68.

A wordsmith of finely chiseled phrases and sometimes devastating wit, Mr. Dillon brought Dallas architecture to national attention, and he introduced local readers to important architectural developments elsewhere. His singular critical voice helped shape civic debate on issues across North Texas, from underdevelopment in South Dallas to the evolution of the downtown Arts District to sprawl in the northern suburbs. He wrote as avidly about little-known local architects doing good work as about international stars.

Read complete article by Scott Cantrell here.

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About the author

After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

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