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6 Ways to Get – And Stay – Motivated

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6 Ways to Get – And Stay – Motivated

| recession, unemployed architects | May 28, 2009

By CC Holland

May 27th, 2009

Find yourself running out of enthusiasm and steam? Are you low on vim and vigor? Here are six ways to get your motivation mojo working again, courtesy of Jason Echols at Black Belt Productivity.

1. Decide exactly what you want to accomplish in a day. Nothing kills motivation faster than an unclear task list (or no task list at all). If possible, plan your day the night before.

2. Stay positive. Is the glass half full, or half empty? Your choice. But know that a good attitude and a proper perspective can help keep you moving.

3. Don’t forget the finish line. Keep your end goals in mind — remember what it is you’re working for, whether it’s a promotion, a project, or taking care of your family.

4. Get plenty of rest. Low energy = low motivation, so don’t skimp on sleep, tempting as it might be to stay up late and get some more things done.

5. Exercise. It’s no secret that a good sweat, especially first thing in the morning, can jump-start both your body and your brain.

6. Eat smart. Yes, it’s sometimes hard to take that lunch break, or even grab breakfast when you’re running late. But a steady diet of vending-machine food, or gorging too much at noontime because you’re starving, can sap your body and slow your motor down.

More information on this reprint from BNET

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About the author

After working at various design practices on a full-time and freelance basis, and starting his own design firm, David McFadden saw that there was a gap to be filled in the industry. In 1984, he created an expansive hub for architects and hiring firms to sync up, complete projects, and mutually benefit. That hub was Consulting For Architects Inc., which enabled architects to find meaningful design work, while freeing hiring firms from tedious hiring-firing cycles. This departure from the traditional, more rigid style of employer-employee relations was just what the industry needed - flexibility and adaption to modern work circumstances. David has successfully advised his clients through the trials and tribulations of four recessions – the early 80’s, the early 90’s, the early 2000’s, and the Great Recession of 2007.

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